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AP English Language: A Block
Instructor: Mr. Marcucci   
This course is designed in conjunction with the freshman composition model used at most universities.  The goal of the course is to further students’ understanding and appreciation of the English language, particularly of language used to analyze, argue and persuade.  Students will study the logic of language, increase vocabulary, and read writing that exemplifies precision and rhetorical force.  In addition, students will look at the visual and oral media which they are inundated with on a daily basis.  Media includes print and television advertisements, pictures, political cartoons, and films.  The course focuses largely on literature of fact.  Students will look at literature of fact through the lenses of stylistic and rhetorical analysis.  They will read pieces that show complexity of thought, construction and argumentation; study the art of persuasion from Aristotle to the present; refine expository writing skills, using the modes of narration, analysis, synthesis, comparison/contrast and argument; expand vocabulary; and review grammatical structures.  Students will be expected to read and write every day and to contribute to class in an active and positive manner.  Students will take the Advanced Placement examination on Wednesday, May 11th at 8 a.m.  
Announcements
April HW:
4/15 - Read and annotate Thoreau's "Where I Lived, and What I Lived For"

4/29 - April Independent Articles: you can pick either a rhetoric-based article, or an argument-based article. Either way, submit 2 articles. If you are absent on Friday because of the Leadership Conference, you want to complete the following free-write for Monday. Here is the prompt:

American essayist and social critic H. L. Mencken (1880–1956) wrote, “The average man does not want to be free. He simply wants to be safe.” In a well-written essay, examine the extent to which Mencken’s observation applies to contemporary society, supporting your position with appropriate evidence.

4/28 - read first 99 pages of Into the Wild (you do not need to annotate, but pay attention to the Big Four)

5/9 - finish Into the Wild

***B Block students who missed the multiple choice from 4/12, here are the answers:

B, C, B, A, C, D, D, E, A, B, D, C, E, A, C
Overview of Class from April - May
Hello everyone,
As we approach the exam (5/11), I want to provide an overview of how the class will run for the next five school weeks:

Week of 4/4 - Synthesis (finish minimum wage; write a response; examine a synthesis question and write)

Week of 4/11 - Rhetoric (syntax, visual rhetoric via political platforms)

Week of 4/25 - Argument (safety v. freedom, continue to hone Six-Part Oration & central argument)

Week of 5/2 - Return to synthesis; as we approach 5/11, we will also review more rhetorical strategies

As always, we will examine 1 multiple question section per week; if you want to "up" the multiple choice questions as we get closer to the exam, please let me know.
Discussion Topics
Files
 Bowling for Columbine Permission Slip.docx
Permission Slip - please print & sign for Monday 3/14!
 Columbine Prompts - B Block.docx
Here are your ten Bowling for Columbine prompts that you created in-class today! We will write the essay on Monday!
 Root Words 3.docx
Quiz on Friday, 3/4
 Says-Does Words.docx
Quiz: 3/15 Learn these words. They are "does" words that you can easily transfer to your essay when discussing rhetorical analysis.
 Word Roots 2.docx
Root Words - Quiz 3 (2/25)
 Word Roots.docx
Word Roots Quiz 2/18
Homework
No "Homework" exist(s)

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